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Tristy

Musings of a Book Addict

I'm married to a scavenger of sorts and he often totes home rescued boxes of books that I paw through with shiny, hungry eyes. I pull out the odd and interesting and add them to my teetering stack.

Currently reading

The Hound of the Baskervilles
Arthur Conan Doyle
E.B. White: A Biography
Scott Elledge
Murder on the Orient Express
Agatha Christie
There Is Nothing Wrong with You: Going Beyond Self-Hate
Cheri Huber, June Shiver
Living Buddha, Living Christ
Thích Nhất Hạnh
No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger
Mark Twain
The Snare of the Hunter
Helen MacInnes
Paintings of Henry Miller
Henry Miller, Lawrence Durrell
Dreamways of the Iroquois: Honoring the Secret Wishes of the Soul
Robert Moss
Pentimento (Back Bay Books)
Lillian Hellman

Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and O

Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Quest to Become a Mother - Peggy Orenstein A friend lent me this book. She warned me that the content was rough, but that the author had a great sense of humor about her journey on the infertility road, and she thought I might resonate with her writing style. I have extremely mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, it's wonderful to read such a smart, witty and honest account of what can be such a difficult and painful road. On the other hand, there were many moments in the book where it seemed that Orenstein was just ranting about doctors and nurses and adoption professionals that wronged her. I understood (and actually found quite helpful) when Orenstein described difficult moments with her doctors, and how she handled them, but she often went over the line into libelous rants about certain people (and it doesn't matter if she changed their names, it's still unpleasant and unhelpful to read). Orenstein also seems to have a very Type A personality, which I found really grating. She handled so many of her situations in ways that were difficult for me to relate to, but this was also valuable to me, as it gave me ideas of how to be more dominant and aggressive in my treatments.With all that being said, I did finish the book, perhaps more than anything else, to find out what happens. Does she get pregnant? Does the adoption come through? Who is Daisy, for whom the book is named? Would I recommend this book to others struggling with fertility issues? Yes, but I would give several caveats. Just as the friend who lent me this book said, "if reading this makes you feel bad - STOP. You are not required to finish this book to please anybody."